Book Cover
In Doubt: The Psychology of the Criminal Justice Process (Dan Simon)
      
To be released in Chinese by Shanghai Jiao Tong University Press (2014).  

Bibliography

Due to the extensive volume of the sources cited in the book, its index does not list the names of the cited authors, nor does it contain a bibliographical list (all sources are of course fully referenced in the book's endnotes). For your convenience, a bibliographical list is produced below.



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Exoneration Case Summaries

Abdal, Habib Wahir: (Link)

Alejandro, Gilbert: (Link)

Atkins, Herman (Link)

Beaver, Antonio: (Link)

Booker, Donte: (Link)

Briscoe, Johnny: (Link)

Brown, Roy: (Link)

Bullock, Ronnie: (Link)

Bunton, Harold: (Link)

Byrd, Kevin: (Link)

Cage, Dean: (Link)

Chalmers, Terry: (Link)

Chatman, Charles: (Link)

Clark, Robert: (Link)

Cole, Timothy: (Link)

Dedge, Wilton: (Link)

Deskovic, Jeff: (Link)

Diaz, Luis: (Link)

Dominguez, Alejandro: (Link)

Doswell, Thomas: (Link)

Elkins, Clarence: (Link)

Fuller, Larry: (Link)

Gauger, Garry, exoneration summary: (Link)

Giles, James Curtis : (Link)

Godschalk, Bruce: (Link)

Gray, David A: (Link)

Green, Michael: (Link)

Gregory, William: (Link)

Halsey, Byron: (Link)

Harris, William O'Dell: (Link)

Hatchett, Nathanial: (Link)

Hayes, Travis: (Link)

Honaker, Edward: (Link)

Hunt, Darryl: (Link)

Johnson, Albert: (Link)

Johnson, Calvin: (Link)

Lavernia, Carlos: (Link)

Lindsey, Johnnie: (Link)

Maher, Dennis: (Link)

Matthews, Ryan: (Link)

Mayes, Larry: (Link)

McGee, Arvin: (Link)

McGowan, Thomas: (Link)

McMillan, Clark: (Link)

McSherry, Leonard: (Link)

Mercer, Michael: (Link)

Miller, Robert: (Link)

Mitchell, Marvin: (Link)

Moon, Brandon: (Link)

Moto, Vincent: (Link)

Ochoa, Christopher: (Link)

Ochoa, James: (Link)

Pendleton, Marlon: (Link)

Phillips, Steven: (Link)

Pierce, Jeffery: (Link)

Piszczek, Brian: (Link)

Pope, David Shawn: (Link)

Powell, Anthony: (Link)

Robinson, Anthony: (Link)

Rose, Peter: (Link)

Ruffin, Julius: (Link)

Salazar, Ben: (Link)

Scruggs, Dwayne: (Link)

Snyder, Walter: (Link)

Taylor, Ronald Gene: (Link)

Turner, Keith E. : (Link)

Velasquez, Eduardo: (Link)

Villasana, Armand: (Link)

Wallis, Gregory: (Link)

Washington, Earl: (Link)

White, Joseph: (Link)

Williams, Willie: (Link)

Woodall, Glenn: (Link)

Youngblood, Larry: (Link)



Other Websites Referenced

Avery, Steven, conviction for murder post-exoneration: (Link)

Dallas County District Attorney Office: (Link)

Dallas Count's Conviction Integrity Unit: (Link)

Dallas County District Attorney Office newsletter, “The Justice Report�: (Link)

John E. Reid and Associates Inc.: (Link)

John E. Reid and Associates Inc., Behavior Analysis Interview: (Link)

John E. Reid and Associates Inc., Investigator Tips, The Polygraph Technique Part II: Value During an Investigation: (Link)

John E. Reid and Associates Inc., Polygraph Examinations: (Link)

Innocence Project, False confessions. (Link)

Innocence Project, Government Misconduct: (Link)

Innocence Project, (Link)

Innocence Project, (Link)

Innocence Project, Reforms by State: (Link)

North Carolina Innocence Inquiry Commission: (Link)

Report to the Legislature of the State of Illinois: The Illinois Pilot Program on Sequential Double-Blind Identification Procedures (The Mecklenburg Report): (Link)

Visual Cognition Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana: (Link) (url moved to: (Link)

What Jennifer Saw, Frontline series (1997), PBS, (Link)



Court Decisions

Abdul-Kabir v. Quarterman, 550 U.S. 233 (2007).

Anderson v. Bessemer City, 470 U.S. 564 (1985).

Arizona v. Youngblood, 488 U.S. 51 (1988).

Barefoot v. Estelle, 463 U.S. 880 (1983).

Bell v. Wolfish, 441 U.S. 520 (1979).

Berger v. United States, 295 U.S. 78 (1935).

Bourjaily v. United States, 483 U.S. 171 (1987).

Brady v. Maryland (373 U.S. 83 [1963])

Bram v. United States, 168 U.S. 532 (1897),

Brown v. Allen, 344 U.S. 443 (1953).

Cage v. Louisiana, 498 U.S. 39 (1990).

Coleman v. Alabama, 399 U.S. 1 (1970).

Colorado v. Connelly, 479 U.S. 157 (1986).

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania v. Bruce Godschalk, 00934-87, Montgomery County, Jury Trial, May 27, 1987.

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania v. Bruce Godschalk, 00934-87, Montgomery County, Suppression hearing, May 26, 1987.

Commonwealth of Virginia v. Edward William Honaker, No. CR1977 (Nelson Co. Cir. Ct. February 6, 1985).

Commonwealth v. DiGiambattista, 813 N.E.2d 516 (Massachusetts, 2004).

Crawford v. Washington, 541 U.S. 36 (2004).

District Attorney's Office v. Osborne, 129 S. Ct. 2308 (2009).

Dix v. AG Canada, 2002.

Duncan v. Louisiana, 391 U.S. 145 (1968).

Dunn v. United States, 307 F.2d 883 (5th Cir. 1962).

Frazier v. Cupp, 394 U.S. 731 (1969).

Furman v. Georgia, 408 U.S. 238 (1972).

Garcetti v. Ceballos, 547 U.S. 410 (2006).

Gilbert v. California, 388 U.S. 263 (1967).

Giles v. California, 554 U.S. 353 (2008).

Greer v. Miller, 483 U.S. 756 (1987).

Gregg v. Georgia, 428 U.S. 153 (1976).

Hayes v. Florida, 470 U.S. 811 (1985).

Hazen v. State, 700 So. 2d 1207 (Fla. 1997).

Hernandez v. New York, 500 U.S. 352 (1991).

Herrera v. Collins, 506 U.S. 390 (1993).

Holland v. United States, 348 U.S. 121 (1954).

Illinois v. Simac, 161 Ill. 2d. 297 (1994).

In re Davis, 130 S. Ct. 1 (2009).

In re Winship, 397 U.S. 358 (1970).

Jackson v. Virginia, 443 U.S. 307 (1979).

Johnson v. United States, 333 U.S. 10 (1948).

Kansas v. Marsh, 548 U.S. 163 (2006).

Krulewitch v. United States, 336 U.S. 440 (1949).

Lego v. Twomey, 404 U.S. 477 (1972).

Lilly v. Virginia, 527 U.S. 116 (1999).

Lisenba v. California, 314 U.S. 219 (1941).

Lockett v. Ohio, 438 U.S. 586 (1978).

Lockhart v. McCree, 476 U.S. 162 (1986).

Louisiana v. Hayes, 806 So.2d 816, 01–736 (La. App. 5 Cir. 12/26/01).

Manson v. Brathwaite 432 U.S. 98 (1977).

McCleskey v. Kemp, 481 U.S. 279 (1987).

Miles v. U.S., 483 A.2d 649 (D.C. 1984).

Miller-El v. Cockrell, 537 U.S. 322 (2003).

Miranda v. Arizona, 384 U.S. 436 (1966).

Missouri v. Seibert, 542 U.S. 600 (2004).

Murray v. Carrier, 477 U.S. 478 (1986).

Nash v. United States, 54 F.2d 1006, 1007 (1932).

Neil v. Biggers 409 U.S. 188 (1972).

Oregon v. Ice, 129 S. Ct. 711 (2009).

Oregon v. Mathiason, 429 U.S. 492 (1977).

Parker v. Randolph, 442 U.S. 62 (1979).

People v. Gow, 382 N.E.2d 673 (Ill. App. Ct. 1978).

People v. Malmenato (14 Ill.2d 52, 61 [1958]).

People v. Monroe, 925 P.2d 767 (Colo. 1996).

People v. Patterson, 88 Ill. App. 3d 168, 176 (1980).

People v. Schader, 62 Cal. 2d 716 (1965).

Perry v. New Hampshire (No. 10-8974, November 2, 2011).

R. v. William Russell, 9 St. Tr. 677, 666 (1683).

Reynolds v. United States, 98 U.S. 145 (1879).

Richardson v. Marsh, 481 U.S. 200 (1987).

Sandez v. United States, 239 F.2d 239 (9th Cir. 1956).

Simmons v. United States, 390 U.S. 377 (1968).

Skinner v. Switzer, 562 U.S. ___ (2011).

Smith v. Phillips, 455 U.S. 209 (1982).

Smith v. State, 553 N.E.2d 832 (Ind. 1990).

State v. Conway, 816 So.2d. 290 (2002).

State v. Cotton, 318 N.C. 663 [1987], No. 257A85.

State v. Cotton, No. 257A85 Alamance Co. Super. Ct., January 7, 1985.

State v. Larry R. Henderson (A-8-08) (New Jersey, 062218).

State v. McCall, 139 Ariz. 147 (1983).

State v. Scales, 518 N.W.2d 587 (Minnesota, 1994).

State v. Taylor, 200 W. Va. 661 (1997).

Stephan v. State, 711 P.2d 1156 (Alaska, 1985).

Stovall v. Denno, 388 U.S. 263 (1967).

Sumner v. Mata, 449 U.S. 539 (1981).

Tanner v. United States, 483 U.S. 107 (1987).

Taylor v. Kentucky, 436 U.S. 478 (1978).

Taylor v. Louisiana 419 U.S. 522 (1975).

Teague v. Lane, 489 U.S. 288 (1989).

United States v. Ash, 413 U.S. 300 (1973).

United States v. Brown, 699 F.2d 585 (2d Cir. 1983).

United States v. Dixon, 201 F.3d 1223 (9th Cir. 2000).

United States v. Garrison, 291 F. 646 (S.D.N.Y. 1923).

United States v. Grunewald, 233 F.2d 556 (1956).

United States v. Kimball, 73 F.3d 269 (10 Cir. 1995).

United States v. Llera Plaza, 188 F. Supp. 2d 549 (E.D. Pa. 2002).

United States v. Ruiz, 536 U.S. 622 (2002).

United States v. Sabater, 830 F.2d 7 (2d Cir. 1987).

United States v. Scheffer, 523 U.S. 303 (1997).

United States v. Wade, 388 U.S. 218 (1967).

United States v. Warf, 529 F.2d 1170 (5th Cir. 1976).

Victor v Nebraska, 511 U.S. 1 (1994).

Wainwright v. Sykes, 433 U.S. 72 (1977).

Watkins v. Sowders, 449 U.S. 341 (1981).

Wright v. West, 505 U.S. 277 (1992).